Midlothian Development

Tnexster
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Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 08 Aug 2018 21:18

What does a $500 million Google data center mean for D-FW's 'Southern Star'?

Interesting development for the south

After close to two years of secrecy, the city now acknowledges that it has inked a deal with Google to develop a multiphase data center project in the city's Railport Business Park. The data center could bring billions of dollars, new jobs and a new image in the long run as the city moves further from its industrial roots.


https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... thern-star

DPatel304
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby DPatel304 » 08 Aug 2018 21:30

"They will develop this project in phases; each phase will be a $500 million capital investment. Over a five-year period, they have to create 40 jobs," Barnett said.


Sounds like a giant rip-off for a measly 40 jobs, all so they can boast about having "Google" in their city.

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tamtagon
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby tamtagon » 09 Aug 2018 06:48

Tnexster wrote:
"Growth, particularly nonresidential growth like this, it's good for us," Lumpkins said. "There's no reason we wouldn't be comfortable with [the data center]."


https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... thern-star


No reason to be uncomfortable until someone comes up with a better way to manage, store, process and administer data.... these gigantic data centers packed floor to ceiling with computers just seems ancient, inefficient and destined to radical change, all that's needed is a breakthrough in technology.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby cowboyeagle05 » 09 Aug 2018 08:46

I mean I don't know what the incentives we provided are but I am happy to have those 40 paying jobs in South Dallas. It doesn't mean those 40 jobs families will live in South Dallas though. This does continue the trend of DFW loading up with lots of new data centers though.
“Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell”

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 09 Aug 2018 08:56

40 is better than zero and if they can score one they may score another or see an expansion of the existing operation.

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Hannibal Lecter
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Hannibal Lecter » 09 Aug 2018 11:30

cowboyeagle05 wrote:I mean I don't know what the incentives we provided are but I am happy to have those 40 paying jobs in South Dallas. It doesn't mean those 40 jobs families will live in South Dallas though. This does continue the trend of DFW loading up with lots of new data centers though.

It's a long way from South Dallas to Midlothian.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby DPatel304 » 09 Aug 2018 11:36

Hannibal Lecter wrote:It's a long way from South Dallas to Midlothian.


Indeed, but more development South will eventually 'pull' the center of DFW closer and closer to the CBD.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 15 Aug 2018 16:55

First Google, now a new hospital heading to Midlothian southwest of Dallas

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... est-dallas

The planned Methodist Health System facility will be the first hospital in the fast-growing north Ellis County community. The hospital and adjoining medical center will employ about 300 healthcare professionals and support staff the first year it opens.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 14 Jun 2019 14:59

Google's massive $600M data center takes shape in Ellis County as tech giant ups Texas presence

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... midlothian

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joshua.dodd
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby joshua.dodd » 17 Jun 2019 03:58

Hannibal Lecter wrote:
cowboyeagle05 wrote:I mean I don't know what the incentives we provided are but I am happy to have those 40 paying jobs in South Dallas. It doesn't mean those 40 jobs families will live in South Dallas though. This does continue the trend of DFW loading up with lots of new data centers though.

It's a long way from South Dallas to Midlothian.


Not really. It's closer to Downtown than McKinney or Frisco.

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tamtagon
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby tamtagon » 17 Jun 2019 06:31

One of these days, someone's going to come along and figure out a way to store data that makes these data centers obsolete.

The deal is for 100% of personal property taxes — taxes on the servers, cabling and equipment that form the heart of a data center — and 85% of improvement taxes for Google over a 10-year period. The incentives are tied to the company's hiring and investment projections.


Corporate welfare, free and clear. We are subsidizing the status quo, undermining innovation and improvement profit for the biggest companies. Life out of balance. whatever

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 03 Feb 2020 21:59

New residential community southwest of Dallas will have thousands of homes
Hanover Property is building the $950 million project in Midlothian.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... -of-homes/

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 04 Jun 2020 10:45

California health products firm eyes new plant southwest of Dallas
Sunrider International sells herbal and health products in the U.S. and abroad.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... of-dallas/

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 13 Jun 2020 11:29

New residential community southwest of Dallas could bring 4,600 homes starting at $250,000
Prairie Ridge project near Midlothian is being built by Dallas’ Provident Realty Advisors.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... -of-homes/

Image

Tnexster
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 27 Jul 2020 16:11

Fast-growing Midlothian lays plans to restore its old downtown
This city southwest of Dallas is getting new industry and housing.

Image

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... -downtown/

A fast-growing community southwest of Dallas has developed a plan to restore its historic downtown.

The Midlothian City Council just approved the road map for its downtown preservation and development. The 82-acre district along Eighth Street comprises the town’s old business district and surrounding area.

“The overarching concept for the future downtown is that it will be a safe, walkable and vibrant destination with a variety of opportunities for entertainment, socializing, employment, culture and residential living,” city officials said in a statement. “Local entrepreneurship will be encouraged in order to grow downtown’s role as a central and vital part of Midlothian’s economy.”

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 22 Nov 2020 19:35

Tnexster wrote:New residential community southwest of Dallas could bring 4,600 homes starting at $250,000
Prairie Ridge project near Midlothian is being built by Dallas’ Provident Realty Advisors.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... -of-homes/

Image


Between this and the nearby massive Emory Lakes development in Waxahachie (10,000 homes), hopefully this part of the Metroplex will see an improvement in retail/restaurant options.

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 21 Apr 2021 16:55

Another huge development has been proposed for Midlothian:

Exclusive: Local developer plans massive 775-acre mixed-use development in Midlothian

https://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news ... oject.html

Image

A Dallas-based developer and a group of local landowners are planning to bring an enormous mixed-use development to Midlothian, according to a site plan obtained by the Dallas Business Journal.

The project would be located north of W. Main Street between U.S. Highway 287 and U.S. 67. It would include nearly 5 million square feet of industrial space, including two 1 million-square-foot warehouses; retail, commercial space, a church, 67.8 acres of mixed-use space, 23 acres of apartments, 95.4 acres of single-family homes, 23.1 acres of townhomes and a park, according to plans.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 22 Apr 2021 16:45

South certainly seems to be gaining momentum these days. There are a ton of these huge developments running across through these southern burbs.

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 22 Apr 2021 17:55

Tnexster wrote:South certainly seems to be gaining momentum these days. There are a ton of these huge developments running across through these southern burbs.


Yep.

This may be the decade they really start to explode.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 23 Apr 2021 10:43

Addison wrote:
Tnexster wrote:South certainly seems to be gaining momentum these days. There are a ton of these huge developments running across through these southern burbs.


Yep.

This may be the decade they really start to explode.


Good point made earlier about the retail and restaurant scene. Southern sector always seems to fall short, hopefully all the new rooftops will change some of that.

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THRILLHO
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby THRILLHO » 23 Apr 2021 12:20

You can only build so far north before you start losing the benefit of close proximity to Dallas & DFW Airport, and I think Prosper is that upper limit.
If we were a sensible region we would be trying to mitigate sprawl. Not gonna happen, but if we had a modicum of sense we would at least be rapidly densifying Plano and Frisco and redirecting that suburban sprawl southwards in the direction of the undeveloped land around 34/287. If downtown Dallas continues to improve it might regain some of its gravitational pull.

Even if you work in north Dallas or Richardson, someplace like Ferris offers the same commute as Prosper...

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 23 Apr 2021 14:45

THRILLHO wrote:You can only build so far north before you start losing the benefit of close proximity to Dallas & DFW Airport, and I think Prosper is that upper limit.
If we were a sensible region we would be trying to mitigate sprawl. Not gonna happen, but if we had a modicum of sense we would at least be rapidly densifying Plano and Frisco and redirecting that suburban sprawl southwards in the direction of the undeveloped land around 34/287. If downtown Dallas continues to improve it might regain some of its gravitational pull.

Even if you work in north Dallas or Richardson, someplace like Ferris offers the same commute as Prosper...


Even if what you say about commuting places like Ferris or Midlothian is true, the main issue that remains with the southern part of DFW are the schools. They're not *BAD*, but aside from Mansfield, they're not great either.

If people are going to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a home, they want to be able to get the maximum ROI they can when it's time for resale (harder to do when your home is not in a competitive district) and also be able to send their own kids to the best of the best schools.

The commercial amenities still have to play catch up too. Ellis County doesn't even have a halfway decent shopping mall or warehouse club, never mind all of the higher-end / specialty stores found all over the northern suburbs.

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby DPatel304 » 23 Apr 2021 15:16

Addison wrote:Even if what you say about commuting places like Ferris or Midlothian is true, the main issue that remains with the southern part of DFW are the schools. They're not *BAD*, but aside from Mansfield, they're not great either.

If people are going to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a home, they want to be able to get the maximum ROI they can when it's time for resale (harder to do when your home is not in a competitive district) and also be able to send their own kids to the best of the best schools.

The commercial amenities still have to play catch up too. Ellis County doesn't even have a halfway decent shopping mall or warehouse club, never mind all of the higher-end / specialty stores found all over the northern suburbs.


Agreed, but I'm hoping the cheaper price points will attract people to these areas initially, which will create demand for more amenities and hopefully provide more revenue for better school districts.

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THRILLHO
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby THRILLHO » 23 Apr 2021 15:17

When the northern burbs were as undeveloped as all the southern burbs currently are (1960s?), I think all of the same descriptors would have applied to them.
It's just a matter of building up an area day by day, brick by brick. Southern DFW could get there someday.

Here's to hoping the high speed rail station and other additions to downtown make being closer to Dallas proper more desirable than planting one's self all the way up in Celina or wherever northward sprawl would be forced to reach in ten years.

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 23 Apr 2021 16:20

DPatel304 wrote:
Addison wrote:Even if what you say about commuting places like Ferris or Midlothian is true, the main issue that remains with the southern part of DFW are the schools. They're not *BAD*, but aside from Mansfield, they're not great either.

If people are going to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a home, they want to be able to get the maximum ROI they can when it's time for resale (harder to do when your home is not in a competitive district) and also be able to send their own kids to the best of the best schools.

The commercial amenities still have to play catch up too. Ellis County doesn't even have a halfway decent shopping mall or warehouse club, never mind all of the higher-end / specialty stores found all over the northern suburbs.


Agreed, but I'm hoping the cheaper price points will attract people to these areas initially, which will create demand for more amenities and hopefully provide more revenue for better school districts.


Agreed, and that may be happening now since buying homes in the northern suburbs has become so insanely competitive. Individuals who now WFH permanently, seek less traffic/congestion and don't have children would be most likely to give the southern areas serious consideration, at least initially.

The cheaper land costs are also starting to attract more high profile developers for master-planned projects.

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R1070
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby R1070 » 26 Apr 2021 14:48

Midlothian is already a nice city. This will make it even better.

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 26 May 2021 23:04

This is another (unspoken) reason why folks have been hesistant to go south.

The below is only a snippet. The full article is in the link

https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/mor ... s-12001496

More Pollution Is Headed for Midlothian, the 'Cement Capital of Texas'

Despite 18 months of pleading with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), residents in Midlothian will have to put up with more air pollution courtesy of one of the city's biggest cement plants.

After Laura Hunt and her family moved from Oklahoma to Midlothian, a half-hour drive from Dallas, in 2015, her daughter began having breathing problems.

“She just had recurrent pneumonia. She stopped eating, stopped growing, her lung function decreased to half normal,” Hunt, a pediatrician, said. “We never could really find much in the way of a medical explanation for the source of the problems. The cement plant was always in the back of my mind.”

There are three major cement plants, Ash Grove, Holcim and Martin Marietta, in Midlothian, often called the “Cement Capital of Texas.”

According to D Magazine, Midlothian produced 3 million tons of cement in 1999. TXI cement was used to build Dallas City Hall, the Meyerson Symphony Center and the J.C. Penney headquarters. A Texas Environmental Resource Consortium study found pollution that came from Ellis County, where Midlothian is located, has a significant effect on the air quality in Dallas, Tarrant, Collin and Denton counties.

Hunt lived near the Martin Marietta plant when her daughter started getting sick in October 2015. Martin Marietta, an American building materials company, bought the plant from Texas Industries (TXI) in 2015. She said they considered relocating, but because she’s a hospital-based pediatrician and needs to live in a 30-minute response time of where she works, moving was not simple.

For the next two years, her daughter’s ailments gradually got worse until 2017 when she was taken to the National Jewish Hospital...

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 12 Jul 2021 10:10

Midlothian, Waxahachie to Gain More Residents for Backyard Rivalry

https://candysdirt.com/2021/07/11/midlo ... d-rivalry/

They’re big rivals in high school sports. Now, they could have more residents to fuel the rivalry.

Developers announced plans this week for subdivisions in Midlothian and Waxahachie, two cities about 30 miles directly south of Dallas along U.S. 287.

Lately, developers have been outlining developments north and east through Collin County. Now, this exurban residential development shifts the focus to Ellis County.


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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 23 Jul 2021 16:53

Ellis County Cities Feel North Texas Boom

https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/ellis ... m/2690505/

Ellis County population now estimated at over 209,000, to reach 500,000 by 2050

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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Tnexster » 27 Jul 2021 10:10

Good luck keeping that small town charm.

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 27 Jul 2021 10:19

Tnexster wrote:Good luck keeping that small town charm.


I always laugh at that foolishness. They want the good schools, abundant retail/restaurant choices and higher property values, but not the "negative" aspects that inevitably come with being a part of a major metro area.

To me, "preserving our small town charm" translates into "I want to have my cake and eat it too."
Last edited by Addison on 27 Jul 2021 11:08, edited 1 time in total.

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CTroyMathis
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby CTroyMathis » 27 Jul 2021 11:06

Small town charm is so subjective. Even in Dallas, in the heart where I'm mostly finding myself, e.g. lower Uptown to EMC Downtown I run across people I already know just walking around or people I came to know decently enough eventually because of daily walkabout/hang-out routines, or, just see the same street acquaintances (a slight stretch) and we nod to each other. It can be cooler than the other side of the Chillow (pillow). This happens in so many other pockets of Dallas, too. You really just got to get out of your damn car to feel the vibe sometimes, that "Hey, small world (town) finding you here."

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 27 Jul 2021 11:10

CTroyMathis wrote:Small town charm is so subjective. Even in Dallas, in the heart where I'm mostly finding myself, e.g. lower Uptown to EMC Downtown I run across people I already know just walking around or people I came to know decently enough eventually because of daily walkabout/hang-out routines, or, just see the same street acquaintances (a slight stretch) and we nod to each other. It can be cooler than the other side of the Chillow (pillow). This happens in so many other pockets of Dallas, too. You really just got to get out of your damn car to feel the vibe sometimes, that "Hey, small world (town) finding you here."


That's generally not what residents in exurban towns mean when talking about "preserving our small town charm" though.

I get it. They've grown accustomed to a certain type of lifestyle and are afraid of the change that growth/development will bring. But it's just plain unrealistic to expect things to remain the same and not adapt while living in the country fastest growing and 4th largest metro area

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CTroyMathis
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby CTroyMathis » 27 Jul 2021 11:17

Small towns do not necessarily equal charm(-ing). Status quo, I like the friends I already have - don't need more, Good Morning, Good Afternoon, Good Evening. In Seattle, it was KBO. Keep the Bastards Out back in the '90s. Don't ruin our charm.

Okay.

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CTroyMathis
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby CTroyMathis » 27 Jul 2021 11:21

Addison wrote:
I get it. They've grown accustomed to a certain type of lifestyle and are afraid of the change that growth/development will bring. But it's just plain unrealistic to expect things to remain the same and not adapt while living in the country fastest growing and 4th largest metro area


True that. It's an inevitable reaction for a lot of people and I understand that for sure. I always like when Tamtagon mentions greenbelts and natural areas to be created/mandated, but, that's another topic stray.

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Addison
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Re: Midlothian Development

Postby Addison » 23 May 2022 16:11

Midlothian development with lakeside beach to include about 8,500 single-family homes


https://www.dallasnews.com/business/rea ... ily-homes/

A massive master-planned community spanning almost 3,300 acres is in the works in Midlothian, with the highlight being a lakeside beach lined with activities for residents.

RREAF Communities, a division of Dallas-based RREAF Holdings, is developing the project 4 miles south of U.S. Highway 287 with about 8,500 single-family detached homes as well as 3,000 rental homes and apartments.

The company acquired the bulk of the property last May. The site is just south of the intersection of FM663 and FM875...

...Development will take place over roughly 10 to 15 years. RREAF is aiming to begin infrastructure work early next year, with the first homes expected to be available by 2025.

Plans for the first phase include about 450 home lots, 230 apartment units and 200 single-family rental homes. RREAF expects it will likely develop the apartments and rental homes itself...